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Meghan Markle and Prince Harry move into sprawling new Sh1.5 billion mansion

Entertainment By Mirror
Meghan and Harry moved into their new pad in July (Image: Getty Images)

The swanky new Sh1.591 billion ($14.7 million) Santa Barbara mansion reportedly bought by Prince Harry and Meghan Markle boasts a swanky library, cinema and spa, as well as nine bedrooms and 16 bathrooms.

The 18,000 square foot home on 5.4 acres of land in Montecito neighbours properties owned by US chat show icons Oprah Winfrey and Ellen DeGeneres.

Property documents reveal the full details of the mansion - situated in the ultra secluded estate - which also features a two-bed guest house, tennis court and swimming pool.

According to real estate group Zillow, the entrance opens onto a wide lane paved with hand-cut Santa Barbara Stone that leads through a grand archway of trees to the main residence.

Meghan's mum Doria Ragland - understood to be acting as one-year-old Archie's nanny - is said to have already visited the house, TMZ reports.

The mansion has a game room, gym, tennis courts, tea house and more (Image: Google)

Harry's dad Prince Charles is said to have helped the pair purchase the home, with a source telling the Daily Mail the heir to the throne was "keen to help out".

"He is devoted to both his sons and any time he can assist them he always will," they added.

The private community, surrounded by sea and mountains, is 90 minutes north of Los Angeles, where the Sussexes had initially been living at a mansion owned by film producer Tyler Perry.

They then moved to their permanent home in secret at the start of July.

It was built in 2003 and sold in 2009 for over Sh2.7 billion ($25 million), while Harry and Meghan's combined wealth is understood to be in the region of Sh4.6 billion ($43 million).

It boasts star studded neighbours including Oprah Winfrey (Image: Sotheby's International Realtors)

The couple reportedly plan to settle in the area and put down lasting roots for themselves and young son Archie - having quit the Royal Family and left the UK in March.

A source told PageSix Harry and Meghan have been "quietly living" in their new home for around six weeks.

"This is where they want to continue their lives after leaving the UK.

"This is the first home either of them has ever owned. It has been a very special time for them as a couple and as a family."

The source added the Sussexes never intended to remain in LA, but saw it as a good place to touch base when arriving in the US as Doria lives there.

The secluded neighbourhood is a far cry from LA (Image: Google)

The pair are said to have disliked the press intrusion during their stay in LA.

Last month they filed a lawsuit against photographers after drones were allegedly used to take pictures of their son Archie.

Filed to the LA County Superior Court, the complaint alleges that photographers captured pictures of the 14-month-old at the Sussexes' Beverly Hills home during lockdown.

The invasion of privacy lawsuit is against unnamed defendants and references California's laws that make photographing or filming someone in their home illegal.

A spokesperson for Meghan and Harry confirmed they had moved into their new home in July, describing the location as having a "quiet privacy" and hope their arrival will not disturb this.

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