The untold health benefits of hugging : Evewoman - The Standard
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The untold health benefits of hugging

 

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Hugging is perceived as a warm greeting or as a way of expressing our feelings but it’s more than that.  Hugging is a powerful healing therapy that is related to our health. When it comes to hugging, there are many ways of doing it for example deep hug, back hug, squeeze hug and the list is endless. All of them have a way of healing and making us feel like all of the burdens have been buried.

Here are the healthy benefits of hugging:

  • Strengthens the immune system

The gentle pressure that is applied when hugging is normally at the sternum (the breastbone that is located at the center of the chest and connects to the ribs), there is an emotional charge created. It stimulates the thymus gland that regulates and balances the body's production of white blood cells, which are known to be the cells of the immune system and protect the body against diseases.  

  • Balances out the nervous system

The galvanic skin response (a sensitive marker of emotional arousal) of someone receiving and giving a hug shows a skin conductance (whereby the skin becomes a better conductor of electricity either external or internal stimuli during physiologically arousing). The moisture and electricity produced in the skin makes the nervous system relaxed.

 

 

  • Relaxes the muscles

Hugs normally have a way of reducing tension in us when there is worry, troubles or any pain. This happens because they increase circulation to the soft tissues which connect, support, or surround other structures and organs of the body. There are feel good hormones (oxytocin and serotonin) produced that help you feel relieved.

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  • Improves your heart health

Hugging decreases the heart rate because it reduces the blood pressure in the body and any cardiac illness. According to a study conducted in University of North Carolina discovered individuals who did not have any contact with their partners developed a quick heart rate of 10 beats per minute compared to 5 beats per minute among those who got to hug their partners.

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