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Home / Health & Science

Accidents, UTIs and intestinal worms trouble Kenyans the most

Health & ScienceBy Beldeen Waliaula | Fri,May 06 2022 00:00:00 UTC | 2 min read

 Person's hand on IV [Courtesy]

Though respiratory diseases and malaria led the pack, the top 10 other most reported conditions included Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs), intestinal worms, injuries from road accidents and eye conditions.

Female pupils aged between 10 and 14 recorded more pregnancies than those of high school in the 15 to 19 age bracket countrywide.

The year in review also saw increased membership to the National Hospital Insurance Fund by 6.64 per cent and attendant increase in the number of deliveries, especially in health facilities, which also increased in tandem with rise in number of medical colleges and medics. The highest were registered nurses, with graduate dentists and physiotherapists being the lowest.

The number of live births a woman would have at the end of their reproductive years that is from 15 to 49 years has reduced to 3.4 births per 1,000 women, meaning approximately every woman of reproductive age will give birth to three children compared to five in 2014.

This was attributed to more women being educated and an increase in uptake of modern methods of family planning.

Despite increased expenditure in healthcare from the national government, the number of health facilities decreased due to closure of some Level II and Level III facilities, including clinics and dispensaries. However, there was an increase in the number of hospital beds and baby cots across the country.   

As in the previous year, the leading causes for admission for children under five included; pneumonia, low birth weight, malaria, bacterial sepsis of newborn, birth asphyxia and birth trauma, diarrheal diseases, gastroenteritis and colitis.

 Despite increased expenditure on healthcare from the National Government, the number of health facilities decreased due to closure of some level II and III facilities including clinics and dispensaries. However, there was an increase in the number of hospital beds and baby cots across the country.   

As in the previous year, the leading causes for admission for children under five included; Pneumonia, low birth weight, malaria, bacterial sepsis of newborn, birth asphyxia and birth trauma, diarrheal diseases, gastroenteritis and colitis.

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