x Health Men's Health Children's Health Nutrition and Wellness Reproductive Health Health & Science Digital News Videos Opinions Cartoons Education E-Paper Lifestyle & Entertainment Nairobian Entertainment Eve Woman Travelog TV Stations KTN Home KTN News BTV KTN Farmers TV Radio Stations Radio Maisha Spice FM Vybez Radio Enterprise BULK SMS E-Learning Digger Classified The Standard Group Corporate Contact Us Rate Card Vacancies DCX O.M Portal Corporate Email RMS
Login ×
BTV
VAS
DCX
RMS

Cell discovery makes prostate cure possible

Health & Science - By Peter Orengo | June 5th 2013 at 12:00:00 GMT +0300

By Peter Orengo

Nairobi, Kenya: Researchers say they have identified a sub-group of cells that could contribute to prostate cancer recurrence, opening up new ways to treat the disease, which has emerged as a top killer of men over 40 in Kenya.

Published in Science Translational Medicine, a study led by Monash University researchers in Australia, found prostate cancer cells that survive androgen (male sex hormone) withdrawal treatment — one of the main treatments for prostate cancer.

Previously unidentified, these cells are potential targets for future treatments. As they are present early in disease development, there is the possibility of therapy before the cancer reaches the aggressive, incurable stage.

Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men, affecting one in six men in Kenya. A non-smoking man is more likely to develop prostate cancer than he is to develop colon, bladder, melanoma, lymphoma and kidney cancers combined.

In fact, a man is 35 per cent more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer than a woman is to be diagnosed with breast cancer.

Any man can get prostate cancer but it is more common amongst men above the age of 50 years. The risk increases, as one gets older. Studies have shown that close to 50 per cent of men over the age of 75 have prostate cancer.

For advanced cases, the best available treatment involves drugs that effectively mimic castration and so deprive the tumour of the male hormones that causes it to grow.

Androgen deprivation therapy is highly effective; however, the tumour eventually becomes resistant to the treatment and regrows in an incurable form.

Led by Prof Gail Risbridger and Dr Renea Taylor of Monash University, researchers obtained tumour samples from 12 men with early stage, localised prostate cancer.

Then, using mouse models to mimic the progression in humans, they closely observed how the cancer cells responded to and survived androgen deprivation therapy. Even after several weeks of androgen deprivation, residual tumour cells continued to persist.

“The results indicate that these persistent cancer cells somehow differ from cancer cells that respond to androgen withdrawal, and are likely to be the precursor cells that lead to advanced androgen-resistant disease. We will now investigate how to effectively target these cells,” Prof Risbridger said.

Prof Mark Frydenberg of the Monash Department of Surgery, and Chairman of the Department of Urology, Monash Health, said ultimately the findings could lead to additional therapies to increase the effectiveness of existing prostate cancer treatments.

The research also appears in the Science Daily and was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, the Victorian Cancer Agency and the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia.


prostate cancer androgen
Be The First To Comment

Top Stories

Covid-19 vaccination exercise kicks off at KNH
Health & Science - By Graham Kajilwa


How borehole water hurts your health
Health & Science - By Gatonye Gathura


Eve D’Souza narrates Covid-19 jab experience
Health & Science - By Jael Mboga


President Uhuru flags off national distribution of Covid-19 vaccine
Health & Science - By Graham Kajilwa and Sara Okuoro


Shot in the arm for counties as Uhuru flags off vaccines
Health & Science - By Graham Kajilwa and Peterson Githaiga


Focus turns on 15 counties as HIV infections rise
Health & Science - By Mercy Adhiambo


Dr Amoth first public officer to get Covid-19 vaccine
Health & Science - By Jael Mboga


400 more test Covid-19 positive as counties receive vaccine
Health & Science - By Betty Njeru


Detaining patients illegal, court declares
Health & Science - By Kamau Muthoni


Nothing has been left to chance, says Kagwe as vaccine roll-out set for Friday
Health & Science - By Judah Ben-Hur


Latest Stories

Covid-19 vaccination exercise kicks off at KNH
Health & Science - By Graham Kajilwa


Eve D’Souza narrates Covid-19 jab experience
Health & Science - By Jael Mboga


Detaining patients illegal, court declares
Health & Science - By Kamau Muthoni


Shot in the arm for counties as Uhuru flags off vaccines
Health & Science - By Graham Kajilwa and Peterson Githaiga


Covid-19 vaccine to be administered today
Health & Science - By Beldeen Waliaula


400 more test Covid-19 positive as counties receive vaccine
Health & Science - By Betty Njeru


Dr Amoth first public officer to get Covid-19 vaccine
Health & Science - By Jael Mboga


Why Covid jab got cold reception at airport
Health & Science - By Graham Kajilwa


UK regulator says will fast-track vaccines for coronavirus variants
Health & Science - By Reuters


Nothing has been left to chance, says Kagwe as vaccine roll-out set for Friday
Health & Science - By Judah Ben-Hur


//

Stay Ahead!

Access premium content only available
to our subscribers.

Or Login With Your Standard Account
Support independent journalism
×
Create An Account
Support independent journalism
I have an account Log in
Reset Password
Support independent journalism
Log in