x Eve Woman Wellness Readers Lounge Leisure and Travel My Man Bridal Health Relationships Parenting About Us Digital News Videos Opinions Cartoons Education E-Paper Lifestyle & Entertainment Nairobian Entertainment Eve Woman Travelog TV Stations KTN Home KTN News BTV KTN Farmers TV Radio Stations Radio Maisha Spice FM Vybez Radio Enterprise BULK SMS E-Learning Digger Classified The Standard Group Corporate Contact Us Rate Card Vacancies DCX O.M Portal Corporate Email RMS
Login ×
BTV
VAS
DCX
RMS

7 tips for a drama-free visit to the salon with your daughter

Hair - By Renee Wesonga | June 29th 2015 at 08:24:22 GMT +0300
Photo: Courtesy

7 tips for a drama-free visit to the salon with your daughter

To many children, a visit to the salon is like a visit to the doctor. Many scream their heads off because they don’t like their hair being touched. It is interesting that many girls love to look pretty, but don’t like the process that goes into making them look pretty. Well, there are ways in which the drama of a girl kicking her legs and fighting with the hairdresser can be controlled.

Here is how:

Build it up: While still at home, talk to your daughter to excite her about the visit. If, for example, you plan to take her to the salon next weekend, start talking about the visit today. You can then have a countdown like you would for her birthday party. How about you ask her to pick the hairstyle to build up excitement? Make it a routine so that your child already knows every Saturday or Sunday afternoon is for visiting the salon.

Keep it short: To make the visit short if, for example, you are taking her for cornrows, wash, condition and blow-dry her hair at home. Many children don’t like strangers touching their hair. Preparing the hair at home thus reduces the amount of time a stranger interacts with their hair.

Bring your own: Just like parents are advised to carry a shaving machine for their sons when they take them for a haircut, carry your daughter's tools and products if you can. Children tend to be sensitive to items they are not familiar with. Carry your combs, hair oil, shampoo and conditioner. Apart from ensuring that your daughter is familiar with the items, you will also be sure of using the right products and tools on your baby girl’s hair. Not all salons sanitize their tools.

Keep it simple: Avoid choosing complicated hairstyles. Choose one that is easy, quick to do and fun for your girl. The longer she stays at the salon, the more unsettled she becomes; it is not easy to get a child to sit still for long periods of time. Also, if you choose a complicated style that takes long to make, your child and the hairdresser get frustrated. It is worse if your daughter is the complaining and whining type.

  1. READ MORE
  2. 1. Beyoncé's daughter Blue Ivy making money already as she narrates Hair Love audiobook
  3. 2. Majority of women want to cut down skin care routine, study
  4. 3. Woman gives birth to own grandchild as surrogate after daughter's IVF struggle
  5. 4. 'I get so upset because my eldest daughter cuts herself off from us'

Entertainment: Carry along something to destruct her from the hair making process. Few salons consider having TVs, books or magazines that target children. As such, your child is bound to get bored. Carry a game, toy, magazine, book or even a coloring book to keep her going. Don’t forget to also bring along some healthy snack for her.

Stay away: There are children who are more stubborn when their parents are around. It is thus, always good for the parent to stay away and that is why some are brought to the salon by house-helps. However, it would be prudent that you stay around to ensure the hairstylist uses the right products and tools on your child’s hair. You also get to ask the hairdresser questions and answer some, apart from helping calm your daughter down when she starts crying. Your presence will also ensure you can have a conversation with your child while her hair is being done.

Let her nap: For those whose children are deep sleepers, it is best to do their hair when they are in that state. This way, you are assured there will be no drama at the saloon.

Top Stories

Dolly Parton's response to first hearing Whitney Houston's I Will Always Love You
Entertainment - By Mirror


Everyday woman: Day in the life of KICC CEO Nana Gecaga
Achieving Woman - By Audrey Masitsa


Confessions: Even with a degree, unemployment leaves me no choice but to entertain men
Lady Speak - By Hilda Boke Mahare


Khloe Kardashian puts her dramatic new look down to supplements not surgery
Entertainment - By Mirror


Six things you should never do for your kids
Parenting - By Esther Muchene


Motherhood penalty: How women are being punished for having children
Parenting - By Njambi Mungai


Harry and Meghan's 'belongings removed from Frogmore Cottage as Princess Eugenie moves in'
Entertainment - By Mirror


Five protective hairstyles you should try right now
Hair - By Audrey Masitsa


Confessions: I got my boyfriend a DNA test and it revealed his mum's secret relationship
Relationships - By Mirror


The difference between baking powder and baking soda
Cooking Tips - By Audrey Masitsa


Latest Stories

Five protective hairstyles you should try right now
Hair - By Audrey Masitsa


Head games: Turn up the volume
Hair - By Shiro Wanyoike


Eight effective tips to control hair fall
Hair - By Esther Muchene


Six home remedies to get rid of dandruff
Hair - By Esther Muchene


How to prevent your wig from shedding
Hair - By Lolita Bunde


Five bad hair habits you need to avoid
Hair - By Lolita Bunde


How to wash your wig and prevent it from smelling
Hair - By Lolita Bunde


How to fix your frizzy synthetic wig
Hair - By Lolita Bunde


Head games: Braided fringe
Hair - By Shiro Wanyoike


Hair trends: Everything you need to know about twist outs
Hair - By Lolita Bunde


Stay Ahead!

Access premium content only available
to our subscribers.

Support independent journalism
×
Log in
Support independent journalism
Create an account    Forgot Password
Create An Account
Support independent journalism
I have an account Log in
Reset Password
Support independent journalism
Log in