x Eve Woman Wellness Readers Lounge Leisure and Travel My Man Bridal Health Relationships Parenting About Us Digital News Videos Opinions Cartoons Education E-Paper Lifestyle & Entertainment Nairobian Entertainment Eve Woman Travelog TV Stations KTN Home KTN News BTV KTN Farmers TV Radio Stations Radio Maisha Spice FM Vybez Radio Enterprise BULK SMS E-Learning Digger Classified The Standard Group Corporate Contact Us Rate Card Vacancies DCX O.M Portal Corporate Email RMS
Login ×
BTV
VAS
DCX
RMS

How to handle an anxious child

Parenting - By Esther Muchene | August 21st 2020 at 02:00:00 GMT +0300
When speaking to a child don’t assume that you know what they need before getting their input (Shutterstock)

Anxiety is something that affects people across all ages. But, it’s actually harder for children because they’re not yet able to process all their feelings and deal with them properly.

Also, children have a hard time finding the right words to express themselves so this is another challenge parents have before they realize they are dealing with an anxious child.

First, you need to really pay attention to signs of distress like, having trouble sleeping and irritability to gauge whether they’re dealing with an anxiety disorder or if they’re having the usual butterflies from time to time.

From there, you can learn the right things to say and what you should never say to them when they’re in that panicky state.

These are some examples you can use to calm them down.

  1. I’m here, don’t worry

It’s hard for them to communicate how they feel when they’re still triggered. They might be crying or tense and you first need to get them to calm down before saying anything else.

Since you’re someone that makes them feel safe, they will be able to let those feelings pass and calm down. It would also help if you hugged them for a few minutes as you try encouraging them.

  1. READ MORE
  2. 1. Six things you need to know about teething
  3. 2. How do you handle parenting criticism from your in-laws?
  4. 3. Parenting: Tips on how to establish and enforce rules at home
  5. 4. Kate Middleton uses clever sofa tactic when disciplining George, Charlotte and Louis
  1. What’s making you afraid?

A parent should take time to understand exactly where the problem is so that you can help them overcome. You need to encourage them to express themselves so that you can get to the root cause and effectively deal with it.

Maybe they’re even feeling triggered in that situation because of a past experience so you need to look at different angles objectively.

  1. I know how you feel

Acknowledge that their feelings are valid whether their fears are real or not because whatever it is they’re afraid of has a real impact in their life.

Talk to them in a calm tone and make sure your full attention is on them.

As a parent remeber that children have a hard time finding the right words to express themselves (Shutterstock)
  1. How can I make you feel better?

Don’t assume that you know what they need before getting their input.

It will do more damage if you force them to do something you think will help which is why you need to engage them more.

Allow them to take control and add to what they’ve suggested.

  1. This feeling will pass

This is way better than telling them ‘don’t be silly it’s nothing,’ or ‘just stop being anxious.’ There is no single person who has stopped feeling anxious by being bashed or criticized.

Effective communication is the best approach here and you should use those assuring words to let that intimidating emotion pass.

  1. You are strong

Once they’ve calmed down and they’re happy again, you should let them know that you are proud of them for being tough.

Anxious feelings are tough to overcome even for adults so this is a huge deal.

This is one of the techniques you can use to empower them to take control of their feelings and fears because you won’t always be there to protect them. They will eventually come to understand that feeling anxious is part of life.

Top Stories

'My partner's mum bought me a wedding dress but we're not even engaged'
Bridal - By Mirror


#Confessions: I still love my cheating ex but he can’t make up his mind
Relationships - By Mirror


Bad bachelor: How do I get out of this sexagenarian entrapment?
My Man - By Art Amacho


Woman left in stitches as she reads back list of goals she made in January 2020
Lady Speak - By Mirror


How to safely bleach your hair with hydrogen peroxide
Hair - By Renee Wesonga


Dry-humping can get you pregnant...even with your clothes on
Health - By Daily Mail


4 ways to break a soul tie
Relationships - By Jennifer Karina


7 Benefits of using eggs for facial treatment
Skin Care - By Naomi Mruttu


Baby daddy: Setting boundaries when you are not in a relationship with him.
Baby Care - By Everlyne Muchoki


How to safely bleach your hair with hydrogen peroxide
Hair - By Renee Wesonga


Latest Stories

Understanding postpartum depression
Parenting - By Esther Muchene


Parenting: Tips on how to establish and enforce rules at home
Parenting - By Derrick Oluoch


How do you handle parenting criticism from your in-laws?
Parenting - By Derrick Oluoch


Chrissy Teigen in 'grief depression hole' after baby loss, quits social media
Parenting - By Mirror


Mum shares genius Christmas balloon game to help parents struggling with money
Parenting - By Mirror


How domestic violence affects your kids
Parenting - By Derrick Oluoch


Kate Middleton uses clever sofa tactic when disciplining George, Charlotte and Louis
Parenting - By Mirror


Pros and cons of being a stay-at-home mum
Parenting - By Audrey Masitsa


Parent's job advert for nanny slammed over 'ridiculous' list of role requirements
Parenting - By Mirror


Six tips for parenting your teen boy
Parenting - By Esther Muchene


Stay Ahead!

Access premium content only available
to our subscribers.

Support independent journalism
×
Log in
Support independent journalism
Create an account    Forgot Password
Create An Account
Support independent journalism
I have an account Log in
Reset Password
Support independent journalism
Log in