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Six tips for parenting your teen boy

Parenting - By Esther Muchene | November 24th 2020 at 07:30:00 GMT +0300
If their father is not around, have a close male friend or relative they can always turn to as a mentor (Shutterstock)

Parenting teens can be quite a challenge as at this point, you don’t know how much control to give up and how much control you need to hold on to.

Teen boys and girls require different things and in most cases you cannot use the same rules for both because they experience relatively different things. Looking at boys, parenting a teenage boy requires a lot of attention as this is the point in their lives that determines who they grow up to be.

Considering he won’t be the only boy in the world going through this, they will tend to compare themselves with other boys who have different parental influence and supervision.

The most unfortunate thing is that in trying to make sure that your child does the best, you might end up making him detest you and thus making him rebel against you.

To avoid pushing them away, we look at some tips for parenting your teen boy.

i.Understand your child

Every child is unique and what worked for their elder brother or cousin may not necessarily work for him. Different kids require different things at this stage of their lives. Some require attention while others prefer having their own space to explore things on their own.

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This means that your parenting approach should fit into your child’s needs and not merely what you are used to or would prefer.

ii.Give them freedom

This is absolutely not the time to follow them to the mall and sit over the next table when they are meeting up with their friends. This is the time to adjust some of your house rules and give them a bit of freedom.

You can consider adjusting their curfew by giving them two extra hours and allow them to go meet their friends without you having to be in the vicinity.

iii.Have positive male influences

Most of the time teen boys don’t want to run to their mummy when they are experiencing some of the changes in puberty. If their father is not around, have a close male friend or relative they can always turn to as a mentor. They will feel more comfortable talking to them about their experiences rather than talking to their mum.

iv.Give them responsibilities

Some things need to be taught early and this is the perfect time to teach your child how to be responsible. Teach them how to survive on their own by letting them learn how to cook, clean, and also commute without you having to be there.

v.Let them choose their interests

Who wouldn’t want their child to be interested in similar things as them? However, you need to learn to let your child choose what they like and what they want.

This is not your second chance at life to achieve what you couldn’t as a child. A good number of parents are guilty of this because they love our kids and want to protect them but it is important that you let your teenager explore. With some guidance, let them join their game, class, club and friendship of choice.

vi.Be their friend

The best way to be able to keep tabs on your teenager is by being their friend. There is a fine line defining parent-child friendship and basic parenting.

Being their friend does not mean that you ignore your role as a parent but it means that they know they can talk to you about anything without judgement or having to put some topics off the table.


Parenting Parenteen Child Care

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