x Health Men's Health Children's Health Nutrition and Wellness Reproductive Health Health & Science Digital News Videos Opinions Cartoons Education E-Paper Lifestyle & Entertainment Nairobian Entertainment Eve Woman Travelog TV Stations KTN Home KTN News BTV KTN Farmers TV Radio Stations Radio Maisha Spice FM Vybez Radio Enterprise BULK SMS E-Learning Digger Classified The Standard Group Corporate Contact Us Rate Card Vacancies DCX O.M Portal Corporate Email RMS
Login ×
BTV
VAS
DCX
RMS

Congestion forces Mathari to turn away sick convicts

Health & Science - By Antony Gitonga | September 10th 2020 at 12:00:00 GMT +0300

Patients at the Gilgil Sub-County Hospital whose management will be taken over by the Ministry of Health after the Cabinet approved the request by Nakuru County Government. [Antony Gitonga, Standard]

The country’s largest mental institution, Mathari National Teaching and Referral Hospital has stopped admitting convicts with mental illness due to congestion.

As a result, inmates and suspects requiring mental services will be incarcerated in prison cells.

The facility stopped admissions to allow social distancing following the outbreak of Covid-19 in the country.

The deputy medical superintendent, Victoria Wamukhoma, explained that only the forensic department where they admit mentally ill offenders had stopped admissions, but outpatient services for the public were available.

Wamukhoma noted that they had around 500 patients in the two wings with 240 of them being inmates.

“We have 580 beds but we can only accommodate 500 due to the spacing requirements set by the ministry in dealing with the pandemic,” she said.

“The forensic department where we admit mentally ill offenders is currently full and some patients are sharing beds and we, therefore, are unable to admit patients under the circumstances,” reads a letter from the facility to the Prisons Department. In another letter written to the Department of Prisons, the medical superintendent in charge, Joseph Jumba, said they had stopped any new admission or transfer of patients.

“We have stopped forensic outpatient clinics, no new admissions or transfers and we shall have limited laboratory services for outpatient services,” he said.

A senior officer from the prison termed the development a major threat to inmates suffering from mental illness in correctional facilities across the country.

The officer who declined to be named said the condition of some suspects was worsening due to lack of treatment, while others were a threat to themselves and other inmates.

“Tens of suspects suffering from a mental breakdown cannot get medical treatment despite the court orders and this means they will have to stay longer in cells,” he said.

In the latest case, Beatrice Mwende, a woman accused of killing her four children in Naivasha three months ago, is still locked up at Naivasha Prison despite a court order that she be admitted to the mental facility for treatment.

Last month, High Court Judge Richard Mwongo ordered that Mwende be transferred to the mental institution for treatment before taking a plea.

The judge ordered that a report on her progress be presented in the court in two months.

In July, the Cabinet approved a proposal by Nakuru County Government to take over Gilgil Mental Hospital.

The move followed a request by the county through the Ministry of Health to take over the facility due to financial constraints.

Be The First To Comment

Top Stories

Covid-19 jab: Will the poor have a fair shot?
Health & Science - By Dominic Omondi


Relief as nurses end strike
Health & Science - By Graham Kajilwa


My wife’s genes are killing our children
Health & Science - By Lydiah Nyawira


Vaccine will be rolled out in June, says State
Health & Science - By Graham Kajilwa


Why Kenyans might have to wait until next year for elusive Covid-19 vaccine
Health & Science - By Mercy Kahenda


Covid-19: Two dead as 280 test positive
Health & Science - By Mercy Asamba


Tanzania changes tune, issues covid-19 rules
Health & Science - By Jennifer Anyango


FDA staff: Johnson & Johnson's one-shot Covid-19 vaccine effective, safe
Health & Science - By Reuters


Kenya records first case of rare mad cow disease in human
Health & Science - By Gatonye Gathura


Fears brain-swelling Nipah virus with up to 75% death rate 'may become next pandemic'
Health & Science - By Mirror


Latest Stories

Relief as nurses end strike
Health & Science - By Graham Kajilwa


Pfizer vaccine found 94% effective in real world
Health & Science - By Reuters


New coronavirus variant identified in New York: researchers
Health & Science - By Reuters


Covid-19 jab: Will the poor have a fair shot?
Health & Science - By Dominic Omondi


FDA staff: Johnson & Johnson's one-shot Covid-19 vaccine effective, safe
Health & Science - By Reuters


Covid-19: what happens if some countries don’t vaccinate?
Health & Science - By WEF


Tanzania changes tune, issues covid-19 rules
Health & Science - By Jennifer Anyango


WHO to compensate for serious jab side effects
Health & Science - By Xinhua


Covid-19: Two dead as 280 test positive
Health & Science - By Mercy Asamba


What you need to know about the coronavirus right now
Health & Science - By Reuters


//

Stay Ahead!

Access premium content only available
to our subscribers.

Or Login With Your Standard Account
Support independent journalism
×
Create An Account
Support independent journalism
I have an account Log in
Reset Password
Support independent journalism
Log in