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Magoha: No success cards bearing politicians’ names, images

CS George Magoha says leaders have developed a bad culture of conveying best wishes to candidates using political materials. [File, Standard]

Education CS George Magoha has warned schools against allowing success cards bearing politicians names or photos.

The CS said leaders had developed a bad culture of conveying best wishes to candidates using political materials.

Prof Magoha spoke after commissioning a tuition block at Kapsabet Boys in Nandi, and urged school heads to destroy such success cards. “These are God’s children, and they belong to Kenya. I don’t say this to despise any politician.”

Form Four and Class Eight candidates will sit national exams in March.

“You don’t need my face if I am wishing success. If you are in Form Four, they will get you early enough after you have finished exams and then they can give you as many success cards as they want. For now, you’re my children,” he said.

The culture of sending success cards for candidates during national examinations is popular and happens just before or during examinations.

The culture of sending success cards is popular and happens just before or during examinations. [Samson Wire, Standard]

In the run-up to 2017 General Election, various political leaders circulated success cards bearing their photographs and slogans to schools.

In 2016, then Education CS Fred Matiang’i directed that mock examinations, whose papers bore Siaya Governor Cornell Rasanga’s portraits, be cancelled. He also interdicted the county director of education and six sub-county directors, and dissolved the Siaya County education board.

In 2018, some leaders in Nairobi circulated cards bearing their photos and best wishes messages to candidates.

However, in the recent past, due to stringent rules to guard against exams irregularities, most boarding school heads collect success cards meant for the candidates, taking advantage of the new national examinations instructions and guidelines issued by the government, which bar candidates from communicating with outsiders during examination period.

They also do this to guard against practices that might lead to exam irregularities, cancellation of results or deregistration of schools.

Magoha said no visitors would be allowed in schools throughout the term, to avert any disturbance and examination malpractices.