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Environment CS Judy Wakhungu says manufacturers, suppliers’ main target

NEWS
By Reuters and Fredrick Obura | August 28th 2017
Environment Cabinet Secretary Judy Wakhungu (PHOTO: File)

NAIROBI, KENYA: Kenya’s law which sets a record Sh4 million or four-year jail term for those who violate the plastic bag ban passes as one of the toughest punishment globally.

It is expected to take effect today (August 28) however in an interview with Reuters, environment CS Judy Wakhungu said the law will initially spare ordinary wananchi.

She said enforcers will initially target manufacturers and suppliers of the outlawed bags.

“Ordinary wananchi will not be harmed,” she told Reuters, using a Kiswahili word for “common man”.

With the new law, Kenya now joins more than 40 other countries that have banned, partly banned or taxed single use plastic bags, including China, France, Rwanda, and Italy.

Many bags drift into the ocean, strangling turtles, suffocating seabirds and filling the stomachs of dolphins and whales with waste until they die of starvation.

“If we continue like this, by 2050, we will have more plastic in the ocean than fish,” said Habib El-Habr, an expert on marine litter working with the U.N. Environment Programme in Kenya.

Plastic bags, which El-Habr says take between 500 to 1,000 years to break down, also enter the human food chain through fish and other animals. In Nairobi’s slaughterhouses, some cows destined for human consumption had 20 bags removed from their stomachs.

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“This is something we didn’t get ten years ago but now its almost on a daily basis,” said county vet Mbuthi Kinyanjui as he watched men in bloodied white uniforms scoop sodden plastic bags from the stomachs of cow carcases.

Samuel Matonda, spokesman for the Kenya Association of Manufacturers, said it would cost 60,000 jobs and force 176 manufacturers to close. Kenya is a major exporter of plastic bags to the region.

"The knock-on effects will be very severe," Matonda said.

"It will even affect the women who sell vegetables in the market - how will their customers carry their shopping home?"

Big Kenyan supermarket chains like France's Carrefour and Nakumatt have already started offering customers cloth bags as alternatives.

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