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VAS

Kenyans must be vigilant on use of public resources

UREPORT
By Benard Amaya; Mitui Patel; | December 7th 2015

The raging debate concerning the use of Eurobond cash is quite healthy. Eurobond is public money and its utilisation is a matter of public concern.

By raising a red flag on the whereabouts of the funds, the Opposition has done the taxpayer a great favour.

Opposition leaders owe it to Kenyans to provide oversight to the Government. When the opposition is trivial or asleep, the people do not get effective service delivery from the State. It is gratifying that they have put the Executive in check but this should be without malice.

I would like to urge the Opposition to step up positive criticism of the State on any malpractices so that wananchi can get value for money. Kenyans did not benefit from Eurobond cash. What happened? Where did the cash go? Was it too little?

At the time of floating the bond, the country was informed the cash would help in infrastructural development, bring down interest rates and reduce the cost of living. Instead, after getting the cash, the reverse was true. Commodity prices rose, interest rates skyrocketed and taxes went up.

Treasury Cabinet Secretary Henry Rotich should come clean as his team is yet to convince the citizens. Indeed, the maths do not add up. I suggest copies of the report be made public.

Governments are elected to transact public affairs in a transparent and accountable manner. All public resources are supposed to be used for the benefit of the citizens. For this to happen, eternal vigilance is mandatory from every mwananchi.

Kenyans have the funny habit of electing leaders, hoping they will act responsibly while in office. That is misguided thinking in a country where leadership is viewed as a highway to personal enrichment.

BAD POLITICS

Tours by the Pope and US President Barack Obama were eye openers to  ordinary Kenyans. The visit by the duo with their message of integrity and service to the nation were quite timely. Can Kenyans learn from these two?

I’m encouraged by the Pope for being so blunt with his message. The straight-talking head of the Roman Catholic Church is a messenger the country needs at this time we are fighting graft and bad governance. Sustained efforts by Kenyans of goodwill will make the country a better place to live in.

Since Independence, Kenya has practised bad politics anchored on negative, hollow propaganda and vote auction. Aspirants do not present a concrete agenda aimed at uplifting the citizens and the country.

In the spirit of eating, public resources are run down systematically and at high speed. What makes us adore evil?

The Pope’s visit should prick the conscience of all citizens, in particular the clergy who must reclaim their high moral ground and guide wananchi out of greed, graft and tribalism. Kenya is crying for redemption from vices.

We tend to ignore massive corruption that most headteachers in Government schools are involved in. Universities, colleges and other institutions are habouring corrupt individuals.

From overcharging school fees to fictitious construction projects to flawed tendering processes in buying foodstuffs, uniforms, text books and stationery, graft is massive in these institutions.

The Government must put in place strong strategies to seal the loopholes in procurement processes.

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