CNN, BBC fall into fake news trap

BBC asked viewers to confirm whether the clips they are watching are being aired on their websites first before believing what they see.
Global news outlets BBC and CNN have been forced to issue clarifications after being the latest victims of fake news about the upcoming General Election.

BBC, whose programme ‘Focus On Africa’ was mimicked to provide a fake story about the Jubilee Party being ahead by a considerable margin in an opinion poll, distanced itself from the clip that has been circulating online.

“The people behind the video tried to make it as authentic as possible by using a clip from the actual programme presenter Peter Okocha but his voice was distorted in the video,” said the network.

“Secondly, the voice used on that report does not belong to any of our reporters. He was not named in the report and if you are familiar with our programmes, you would know that we name all our reporters and contributors on air,” it said.

The company asked viewers to confirm whether the clips they are watching are being aired on their websites first before believing what they see.

CNN also came out to distance itself from a clip also showing President Uhuru Kenyatta’s popularity surging ahead, “despite his lack of participation in the recent presidential debate.”

The video, which was actually a cut from a CNN Philippines broadcast with the logo of the broadcaster superimposed on the rest of the footage, showed that 59.8 per cent of Kenyans prefer President Kenyatta compared to his challenger Raila Odinga.

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“This report on Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta is fake. CNN did not produce or broadcast the story,” said the network. 

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