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Kenya sets new regulations for religious leaders, churches

By Cyrus Ombati
Updated Mon, January 11th 2016 at 00:00 GMT +3
Attorney General Githu Muigai

Kenya: New rules that require clerics to submit certificates of good conduct and their theological training certificates are now ready for implementation.

The Religious Societies Rules published by the Attorney General‘s Office also require that all religious organisations submit their constitution showing statement of their doctrine of faith. The rules affect imams, pastors, rabbis and other religious leaders.

Any religious society in Kenya must have its constitution with programmes, ministries, charitable activities and education activities undertaken by the religious society and details of persons coordinating these activities. According to the new rules, all religious societies must be registered and open to the registrar's inspection any time. All religious leaders must make a declaration of familial relations with other religious leaders and officers. In this case, officers include secretary, treasurer, trustees and committee members.

They also demand that all pastors in Kenya must hold a theological certificate from an accredited theological institution. The new rules are set to be gazetted at the end of January, officials at the Attorney General's Office said Sunday. They will, however, be operational after a year.

The rules are aimed at regulating religious bodies. They will affect all faiths, including mainstream Christian, Hindu and Islamic institutions and the numerous small groupings that have been accused of conning and brainwashing their followers or engaging in radicalisation and other dangerous doctrines.

Back in November 2014, Attorney General Githu Muigai had promised regulations to help streamline churches and mosques following a public outcry. This was aimed at weeding out those who want to commercialise churches and stop mosques from being used as breeding grounds for terrorists.

"Recent media reports on alleged illicit activities by certain religious institutions have necessitated us to take remedial action," he had said in a statement.

Aware that the Constitution provides for the freedom of worship, Prof Muigai said the Government was only seeking to hold religious leaders accountable to their flock.

"The idea of religious freedom is fundamental. However, it cannot be left without oversight. People want the Government to do more," he said.

And recently, Deputy President William Ruto promised 'suitable amendments', saying the Government will not muzzle the church. Ruto assured faithful during a Sunday service at Jesus Celebration Church in Bamburi, Mombasa. "We will do the necessary amendments to ensure only those who are misusing the word of God are dealt with," he said.

However, a section of the clergy have faulted the Government over the proposed rules aimed at radically changing the way churches operate.

The new regulations also demand that any individual church be a member of an umbrella body and each body must have 2,500 churches registered as an Umbrella Religious Society. They also require that any religious organisation submit a letter of authorisation from the headquarters and a copy of a duly notarised registration certificate of the headquarters, specify the physical address from which it intends to operate, which shall include details on the land reference number or plot number, building, floor and the street or road on which the religious society will be situated.

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