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Politics
When the rain started beating Jubilee
By Reuben Wanjala | Updated Nov 23, 2018 at 18:53 EAT
when-the-rain-started-beating-jubilee
President Uhuru Kenyatta. [Source/Twitter]
SUMMARY

In 2013, former president Mwai Kibaki handed over the mantle of leadership to the incoming duo of President Uhuru Kenyatta and Deputy President William Ruto

The two were parenthetically seen as the state's best shot towards economic excellence albeit the fact that they still had a pending case with the ICC 

In 2013, former president Mwai Kibaki handed over the mantle of leadership to the incoming duo of President Uhuru Kenyatta and Deputy President William Ruto. The two were parenthetically seen as the state's best shot towards economic excellence albeit the fact that they still had a pending case with the International Criminal Court, ICC, for crimes committed against humanity in the ill-fated aftermath of the 2007 general elections.

The Jubilee administration came in with lots of ambitions and anticipation to deliver to Kenyans and did quite well until things started going south. The exact same point that the rain started beating is where we should evaluate and look at it from a deeper state. The fault is not really the government's, is it? Well, that can be hard to take in but it is the truth.

If we travel back in time and look at the instances that happened within the first few months of the Jubilee administration, you will realize that there is a striking truth that seems unknown to many, even though many will not really want to hear about it or take it in.

The jubilee administration needed time to implement all that it had promised to deliver. Both the president and his deputy needed to be given time to fully set things in motion especially given the fact that they had so much on their hands to deal with, as in clearing with the ICC. That 'time to set everything in motion' was obviously not given and as the administration struggled to cope with the rigors of transition from the fairly successful Kibaki regime, all started going south.

Teachers felt like they were being treated as second class public servants and decided that downing tools until their requirements were met was the way to go. For about three full months, education was crippled in the country with no chance whatsoever of the development of an amicable solution.

The strike by doctors and nurses as well as the battles and rebuttals with the agriculture sector followed suit as various government institutions remained just totally dysfunctional. Well, to me, that is where you and I got it wrong. The demands for the deliverance of services was just too high. The pressure meant that the government gave in and kind of started crumbling at a very tender age.

This is not to say that the teachers or the nurses were wrong to go on strike demanding for the rights, it, however, set the rhythm for the ugly tone we all noticed from then on wards.

The timing was wrong and judging from the kind of pressure that the state was under at the time, it really should not have taken place. The emanation of all these of course points towards each citizen. It happened because everyone was a catalyst.

The teachers were encouraged to 'seek better services' as the government was thought to be in deep slumber. Kenyans on social media, who had sadly made the Jubilee administration a fountain of criticism played a big role in effecting the same.

There is also the menace of Tribalism and Nepotism that seems to be, sadly, here to stay. Well, the government does not really do that. But the individuals forming it do. We are in a democratic society and the government is basically made up of you and me and to serve us--government for the people, by the people.

For as long as we continue allowing tribalism and nepotism to cloud our ways of thinking and decision making, we may never prosper as a nation. We shall always feel like we are moving but will always come back to where it all started, that will be a suicidal merry-go-round. we need to avoid it.

Everything can never really just fall into place, there has to be plans and procedures to the execution of every activity. Most Kenyans seem to believe the complete opposite of that.

Mahatma Gandhi once said 'You have to become the change you want to see.' That, to me, is the rule of the game. If you want to change who you are, just change.

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