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ELECTION 2022

Uhuru’s shake up plan as CSs plan to quit

POLITICS
By Jacob Ng’etich | Jan 21st 2022 | 3 min read

President Uhuru Kenyatta chairs the Cabinet meeting at State House, Nairobi on March 19, 2020 [Courtesy]

A Cabinet reshuffle looms following the planned exit of Cabinet Secretaries eyeing elective seats in the August 9 elections.

President Uhuru Kenyatta faces the tough task of filling positions that will fall vacant as soon as possible to avoid disruption of legacy projects six months to the end of his term.

Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC) Chairman Wafula Chebukati said State and public officers seeking seats have to resign by February 9 as required by law.

A source told The Standard that five CSs have tendered their resignation to pursue political interests.

According to the source, CSs, Principal Secretaries and Chief Administrative Secretaries eyeing elective seats had been given up to December by the President through Head of Public Service and Secretary to the Cabinet Joseph Kinyua to resign early enough for planning purposes.

“A number of CSs and other senior government officials have tendered their resignation. They will be leaving by the end of January,” said the source who sought anonymity. 

Notably, the source indicated the President had settled on names that would join Cabinet after the looming exits. It is understood that names of the incoming CSs and other senior government officials had been shared with the Intelligence agencies for vetting. Understandably, the purge against Deputy President William Ruto’s allies in National Assembly committees is expected to pave the way for new appointees who will hasten the vetting of the nominees to the Cabinet.

On Tuesday, National Assembly Majority Whip Emanuel Wangwe wrote to William Kisang (Marakwet West), Katoo ole Metito (Kajiado South), Catherine Waruguru (Laikipia Woman Rep), Ali Wario (Bura), Kareke Mbiuki (Maara) and David Gikaria (Nakuru Town East) to respond to notices of ejection, giving justifications on why they shouldn’t be removed. 

Metito chairs the Defence Committee, Gikaria (Energy), Wario (Regional Integration), Mbiuki (Environment and Natural Resources), Kisang (Communication and Innovation) and Waruguru (Vice-chair, Agriculture). They are accused of not being loyal to the Jubilee Party by having opposed the Political Parties (Amendment) Bill, 2021. 

IEBC has warned that only those who comply with the order to quit six months to the polls will be cleared to run.

National Treasury CS Ukur Yatani, Charles Keter (Devolution), John Munyes (Mining), Simon Chelugui (Labour), Peter Munya (Agriculture) and Sicily Kariuki (Water) have shown interest in elective seats.

Most of the CSs The Standard spoke to said they were bound by the code of ethics and will speak openly when they are out of office. “I will engage you more when I get out of office and hit the campaign trail,” said a CS.

Yatani will be seeking to recapture the Marsabit gubernatorial seat that he lost to Governor Mohamed Ali. Munya is also seeking to unseat Meru Governor Kiraitu Murungi while Keter is eyeing Kericho governorship. Chelugui will battle for Baringo governor seat. Munyes wants to replace Turkana Governor Josaphat Nanok.

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