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Schools turn to sniffer dog to unearth drugs

Learning institutions are using sniffer dogs to flush out drugs from their compounds.

In the past two weeks, the management of secondary schools have sought services of an English springer spaniel dog.

The imported breed from Britain has unearthed drugs and mobile phones sneaked into dormitories among other places by secondary school students.

Last week, a team led by Kissinger Sambu (a recovered drug addict), pitched camp at Kangema High School in Murang’a where bhang, drugs and mobile phone parts hidden by the students were recovered.

In one of the dormitories, the dog barked non-stop until Kissinger climbed up the roof and removed rolls of bhang wrapped in a polythene paper.

The breed is rated highly by detectives in Europe over its specialty in detection of explosives and other materials containing Lithium ion, in war zones

Kangema high school Principal Nduati Irungu said students had been asked to surrender mobile phones among other substances, and once the dog moved in, a lot of hidden materials were exposed in dormitories and classrooms.

“The dog has done a good job as the materials recovered could have been left in the compound years ago. Now we have drug a free environment, a lot of checking will be done when students report back,” he said.

Nduati proposed that Kenya National Examination Council (Knec) should invest in the breed as a way of curbing cheating in examination.

“Those who sneak in calculators and mobile phones in examination centres,  their days are numbered as the dog will expose them,” said the principal.

Some of the unwanted substances were flushed from toilets. Sambu, a reformed drug addict, said he is keen to ensure drug free learning institutions in
Kenya. To conduct a drugs
search, he charges schools basing on number of students.

“It is my passion to have a drug free society but my childhood friends are busy trying to legalise bhang usage in Kenya. This move that must be resisted by all,” he said of the intention by Kibra MP Ken Okoth to introduce a Bill to legalise bhang.

Daniel Karaba, a former high school principal,said the heads of institutions are facing uphill challenge to keep drugs away from students.

The immediate former Kirinyaga senator told School and College that schools must devise ways and means to fight drugs.

“In the old days, bhang was the only known drug and children feared being associated with it unlike today when it is widely smoked,” he said.

At Kahatia secondary school, Principal James Kamau said they acquired a gadget to help detect mobile phones.

“We also conduct random inspection  to check for unwanted  things in  the classrooms and dormitories,” he said.