× Digital News Videos Health & Science Opinion Education Columnists Lifestyle Cartoons Moi Cabinets Kibaki Cabinets Arts & Culture Gender Podcasts E-Paper Tributes Lifestyle & Entertainment Nairobian Entertainment Eve Woman TV Stations KTN Home KTN News BTV KTN Farmers TV Radio Stations Radio Maisha Spice FM Vybez Radio Enterprise VAS E-Learning Digger Classified Jobs Games Crosswords Sudoku The Standard Group Corporate Contact Us Rate Card Vacancies DCX O.M Portal Corporate Email RMS
×
VAS

Plastics ban on beaches and national parks laudable

EDITORIAL
By Editorial | June 3rd 2020
Indeed, although plastics have their advantages, the long term negative effects associated with them far outweigh anything positive about them.

The law banning single use plastics in national parks, along beaches, in forests and conservation areas comes into effect this Friday.

The ban on plastic bottle, plate, cup, among others, was announced by President Uhuru Kenyatta during the Women Deliver 2019 Conference in Vancouver, Canada.

The ban on these plastics in national parks, beaches and forests is in addition to the one imposed on plastic carrier bags in August 2017. 

Indeed, although plastics have their advantages, the long term negative effects associated with them far outweigh anything positive about them.

It does not help that plastic is non-biodegradable, therefore a nuisance for generations to come as it continues to choke not just the soil, but the seas, oceans and lakes, and with it, valuable marine life.

Domestic and wild animals have not been spared the dangers of plastic carelessly discarded by the roadside and in parks by visitors. A number of them have died from ingesting the plastic.

Quite often, drainage in urban areas gets clogged, in turn, leading to serious flooding in some residential areas. The major culprit in most of these cases is the plastic that uncaring people carelessly throw into trenches and the drainage systems, thus causing blockages.

That is why the Government should consider extending the new ban on plastics to the entire country, besides the national parks, beaches and forests.

However, banning plastics is not enough. Despite the 2017 ban, plastic bags can still be found in use by small-scale traders.

Someone is clearly sleeping on the job, which defeats the purpose for concerted environmental protection efforts.

Share this story
Man held over killing, burying his brother
A number of villagers told The Standard that two brothers had a frosty relationship and always fought after drinking.
Diabetes: Insulin now an essential drug
Listing NCDs is a relief to Kenyans like 65-year-old Kahuho Mathai from Nyeri County, who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure.

.
RECOMMENDED NEWS

;