Lessons from doctors’ and lecturers’ strike

Lessons from doctors’ and lecturers’ strike
Lectures during a past demonstrating ( courtesy)

After exactly 100 days of work boycott by doctors and 54 days of lectures' strike that paralysed learning and research at all public universities, an agreement with the Government was reached.

All university academic staff members will enjoy a salary increase of 17.5 per cent with the least paid academic staff – an assistant lecturer – to earn Sh82,037, up from Sh69,794.

A professor who earns Sh144,672 will now take home Sh170,050 a month and a house allowance of 3.9 per cent.

All doctors in different job categories will receive increased allowances ranging between 105 and 165 per cent as they wait for the conclusion of negotiations for a new structure for basic salary to be registered in court within 60 days and a new medical risk allowance of Sh20,000 a month.

The return-to-work formula was a fundamental step towards the restoration of normalcy and sanity to our universities and the health sector.

Apologies to Kenyans by doctors' union chairman Samuel Oroko, Health Cabinet Secretary Cleophas Mailu and Ouma Oluga (doctors' union secretary general) after the deal was struck, raises more questions than answers on labour freedoms, rights and employers' commitment to Collective Bargaining Agreement.

Should civil servants always strike for action to be taken or should patients lose lives for action to be taken?

The just ended strikes clearly indicate that measures in place are wanting and needs fresh thinking to avert loss of time and poor morale occasioned by peanut pay.

Equity in remuneration brings about motivation, less unrests and improved performance at work places.




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