Employers frequently judge candidates on the basis of whether they like them rather than matching their strengths to the responsibilities of the position. [iStockphoto]

According to a survey by Robert Half, 62 per cent of professionals lose interest in a job if they don’t hear from employers in 2 weeks or 10 business days. The figure rises to 77 per cent if the status update takes up to 3 weeks.

Trusting the first impression

Employers frequently judge candidates on the basis of whether they like them rather than matching their strengths to the responsibilities of the position.

Keep connected with top candidates

Reinforce interest to keep them aboard. You need to let them know that you have not forgotten about them.

The perfect candidate does not exist

Other than stretching out offers to potential candidates hold out candidates who check every requirement.

Check your job description

An accurate job description reflects the skills needed for the job position. You may end up sorting out resumes of candidates that fall short of requirements hence prolonging the hiring process.

Narrow in search

With a diversified workforce, you may attract different types of people who would not normally apply for a position at your company.

Do not be afraid to bring in someone who can challenge you.

Lack of honesty

Failure to describe the job requirements may lead to a bad hire.

List responsibilities skills knowledge and experience and talent the person you are looking for possesses.

Undefined hiring policy

A company can fail to define its hiring policy before beginning an employee search.

This can confuse hiring managers and candidates or invite legal troubles when it comes to contract workers and exempt versus non-exempt employees.

Ignoring social media

A weak social media presence can damage your company’s reputation. A neglected Facebook account may suggest a company is lazy and does not interact with customers.

Right candidate wrong role

The worst mistake is to assign a new talent in the wrong role. They end up getting frustrated because they are not doing what they are used to or what they have an experience in.

Delayed firing

It’s a mistake to hold on to an employee who is not doing well. Your company is a reflection of who you hire.

If you make a bad hire and keep the person on board, you are doing the company an injustice.

Some hires are kept because of loyalty, negligence and lack of time to find new talent.

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