Biggest myths about modern job interviews

Proper preparation can give you a significant advantage in your job search. [iStockphoto]

Myths are stories that are based on traditions of beliefs. They may have actual truths and in some other cases, fictional.

Fear and excitement are common feelings to experience over a job interview. Interviews represent the chance to go from a job you dislike or have outgrown to a new opportunity that is full of potential.

For these reasons, many job seekers become laser-focused on interview preparation, seeking advice and tips to refine the art of answering questions and building rapport.

Proper preparation can give you a significant advantage in your job search.

Employers look for a competent candidate with the right mindset. [iStockphoto]

However, beware of these myths related to job searches:

1. There’s no way to prepare for an interview

Many candidates think that it’s a free flow, there are no right answers to questions.

Reality

On the contrary, there are right answers and the proper voice and tone for the interview.

2. List your strengths

Your strength is a straight ticket to a job opportunity. This is not always true.

Reality

A candidate should explain their strength and explain what they have achieved; prove that they are problem solving oriented.

3. You can never be late for an interview

Better late than never but not for an interview. If you are late just go home.

Reality

Show respect for your interviewer’s time and interest in the job opportunity. You cannot be accused in a single occasion. Do not be late without an explanation

4. Dress to impress

The first impression counts, it can make or break a business or relationship.

Reality

We live in the 21st Century where corporate culture is laid back. For instance, a hoodie is no longer an untidy outfit but represents a person who likes comfort and practical things. However, it is vital to know your audience.

5. Looking for the perfect candidate

There can never be a perfect match for a vacancy. Anybody can work with the right kind of motivation.

Reality

Looking for a competent candidate with the right mindset.

Good grades give you a voice in a competitive selection but it’s not necessarily the disclaiming factor. [iStockphoto]

6. ‘Tell me about yourself' is an irrelevant question

It’s a detailed summary of your resume. If a mistake is done while narrating, the interviewer might think you are not confident with your information.

Reality

You may forget critical information while giving useless details.

Employers try to see your reaction, your reaction to a question with no structure and provide your skill.

7. High grades guarantees a good job

Many candidates put too much emphasis on grades.

Good grades give you a voice in a competitive selection but it’s not necessarily the disclaiming factor.

Reality

A candidate should have his/her competencies with or without good grades.

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