Supreme Court judge Wanjala hospitalised in India with swine flu

Supreme Court judge Smokin Wanjala (pictured) is down with H1NI, otherwise known as swine flu, Chief Justice David Maraga confirmed on Wednesday.

Maraga said Wanjala was hospitalised at Apollo Hospital in India and was receiving treatment for the flu that shares symptoms with the new coronavirus.

Its symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, chills and body aches.

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“The judge is making great progress and may be discharged today,” Maraga said on Twitter as he wished him a speedy recovery.

59-year-old Wanjala was in the country for an international judicial conference.

Six Indian Supreme Court judges have also tested positive for the H1N1 flu.

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India Chief Justice Sharad Arvind Bobde who doubles as the Supreme Court Bar Association President confirmed the infections.

According to various Indian new outlets, judges and lawyers have been spooked by the outbreak of the flu for the past 10 days.

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The situation has derailed the hearing of cases in numerous courts.

India Health Ministry yesterday said five of the six Supreme Court judges were treated and isolated at home, adding that prophylactic treatment was being given to all in contact with them.

The ministry is expected to set up a dispensary at the country’s Supreme Court premises today.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) notes that the flu is caused by the H1N1 virus strain, which started in pigs.

“[The] illness tends to be most severe in the elderly, in infants and young children, and in immunocompromised hosts,” WHO explains, adding that typical treatment included rest, pain relievers and fluids.

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Swine FluSmokin WanjalaDavid MaragaH1N1