× Digital News Videos Health & Science Opinion Education Columnists Cartoons Lifestyle Moi Cabinets Arts & Culture Ramadhan Special Podcasts E-Paper Lifestyle & Entertainment Nairobian Entertainment Eve Woman Travelog TV Stations KTN Home KTN News BTV KTN Farmers TV Radio Stations Radio Maisha Spice FM Vybez Radio Enterprise VAS E-Learning Digger Classified Jobs Games Crosswords Sudoku The Standard Group Corporate Contact Us Rate Card Vacancies DCX O.M Portal Corporate Email RMS
×

Kenya to use Alphabet's balloons for rural internet

SCI & TECH
By Reuters | July 5th 2018
Joe Mucheru the Cabinet Secretary ICT

The government will use Alphabet Inc’s system of balloons to beam high-speed Internet access in hopes of connecting more of its rural population to the web, its ICT Cabinet Secretary said.

Known as Project Loon, the technology was developed by Alphabet’s X, the company’s innovation lab. It was used by U.S. telecom operators to provide connectivity to more than 250,000 people in Puerto Rico after a hurricane last year.

Joe Mucheru, the information, communication and technology minister, told Reuters on Wednesday that project representatives were holding talks with local telecom operators on the deployment of the technology.

“The Loon team are still working out contracts and hopefully once that is done, we can be able to see almost every part of the country covered,” he said.

The project confirmed it was holding talks locally but it did not give details.

“We are always in discussions with governments and telcos around the world,” said a Project Loon spokesperson in London.

With more than 45 million people, Kenya’s major cities and towns are covered by operator networks, but vast swathes of rural Kenya are not covered.

A Microsoft backed Kenyan start-up has been using under-utilised television frequencies to connect some of those rural communities.

Take a quick survey and help us improve our website!

Take a survey

“Loon is another technology that is being introduced that the licensed operators hopefully can be able to use,” Mucheru said, adding it would help the government meet its goal of reaching everyone.

“Connectivity is critical. If you are not online, you are left out.”

Share this story
To fight drought, involve communities
According to the latest information from the Meteorological Department, rainfall will be poorly distributed in April, May and June, and this will have a serious impact on agriculture
I eagerly await my baby's first steps
Spina Bifida, and though rare in the general population, it is the most common neural tube defect in the world
.
RECOMMENDED NEWS

Feedback