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Rift Valley
National Land Commission (NLC) has been asked to speed up its planned land adjudication in Kerio Valley region to resolve ownership conflicts.

National Land Commission (NLC) has been asked to speed up its planned land adjudication in Kerio Valley region to resolve ownership conflicts.

In a gazette notice dated March 1, NLC sanctioned fresh adjudication exercise covering over 400,000 acres in Kerio Valley after it found out the previous exercise was not done properly.

“The commission recommends that a review of the whole adjudication process is undertaken by NLC, Ministry of Lands and Physical Planning, county government of Elgeyo Marakwet and clan elders with a view of solving the claim amicably,” recommended the NLC.

Local residents who blame conflicts and violence on boundary rows hailed calls by NLC for fresh land adjudication.

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They said the process would offer a solution to past massive irregularities that have led to disputes that erupt into violence.

Land crooks

Representatives of several clans said they have been fighting for decades to reclaim their land back after crooks, in cahoots with Ministry of Lands officials, invaded the region and subdivided it before selling to unsuspecting locals.

“People from other regions are now living on our land and whenever we try to repossess the plots, we are chased away. We now believe justice will be served when the fresh adjudication commences,” said chairman of Kongot clan Joel Kiptunoi in a meeting at the weekend.

He said they have lost over 400 acres of clan land to grabbers who have since sub-divided it and sold to unsuspecting individuals.

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“Land in Kerio Valley lack registration documents because it is communally owned through clans. This has made it easy target for speculators to grab and sell while disinheriting us our property,” he said.

When The Standard visited the region yesterday, the clan members were identifying clan boundaries which are traditionally demarcated.


National Land Commission Kerio Valley Elgeyo Marakwet

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