Happy ending to twin saga a plus for science

Melon Lutenyo and Sharon Miteka. [Standard]
Many contend we live in a global village, and social media has shrunk the spaces even more. Thus, while separated by physical distance, Sharon Miteka and Melon Lutenyo met on Facebook and instantly got curious about each. This was brought on by their stunning resemblance. With one thing leading to another, the reality they could be twins downed, but needed to be proven through a DNA test.

Thus, a DNA test done by Lancet Kenya has ended months of anxiety and speculation about the girls’ parentage by confirming the two girls are indeed biological twins separated at birth in 1999 at the Kakamega General Hospital. This is a story that has had many twists, but thankfully has been conclusively finalized. The families involved will have to cope with the emotional trauma, which, hopefully, counselling and acceptance of the inevitable can take care of.

The mix up that separated the twins at birth is a case of negligence at the Kakamega General Hospital. It also could be symptomatic of what happens in many hospitals. So how many other parents are bringing up children who are not biologically their own? This case should be investigated and those found culpable punished.

Hospitals need to take extra care, especially when handling newborn babies who have to spend most of their time in incubators for medical reasons. Arguably, unless it is a deliberate switch, it is true that negligence could result in switching babies.

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Sharon MitekaMelon LutenyoLancet KenyaDNA test