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Ethiopian Airlines crash report reveals what pilots did before accident
By Vincent Kejitan | Updated Apr 04, 2019 at 12:52 EAT
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SUMMARY

“The crew performed all the procedures repeatedly provided by the manufacturer but was not able to control the aircraft"

Ethiopian Airlines CEO Tewolde GebreMariam, on his part, said he was proud of the pilots for maintaining professionalism even in such circumstances

A preliminary report on the Ethiopian Airlines plane that crashed on March 10, 2019, killing 157 people has revealed that the pilots followed all expected procedures.

This is according to Ethiopia’s Transport Minister Dagwamit Moges who briefed members of the press in Addis Ababa on Thursday.

“The crew performed all the procedures repeatedly provided by the manufacturer but was not able to control the aircraft.

“Since repetitive uncommanded aircraft nose down conditions are noticed ... it is recommended that the aircraft control system shall be reviewed by the manufacturer,” said Moges.


Ethiopian Airlines CEO Tewolde GebreMariam, on his part, said he was proud of the pilots for maintaining professionalism even in such circumstances.

“Despite their hard work and full compliance with the emergency procedures, it was very unfortunate that they could not recover the airplane from the persistence of nose diving.

“We are also very proud of our Global Standard Pilot Training Center and the Ethiopian Aviation Academy which is one of the largest and most modern in the world equipped with state of the art and latest training technologies,” said GebreMariam.

In 2018, a preliminary report into the Lion Air crash revealed that the pilots lost control after grappling with the plane’s Manoeuvring Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) software, a new automated anti-stall feature that repeatedly lowered the nose of the aircraft based on faulty data from a sensor.

On Wednesday, Boeing announced that it had successfully tested an update of the MCAS software designed to make it easier for pilots to handle.



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