x
x Sports Olympics Volleyball and Handball Cricket Hockey Gossip & Rumours World Cup 2018 Sports Premier League Eliud Kipchoge videos TV Stations KTN Home KTN News BTV KTN Farmers TV Radio Stations Radio Maisha Spice FM Vybez Radio Digital News Opinions E-Paper Videos Lifestyle & Entertainment Nairobian Entertainment Eve Woman Travelog Enterprise VAS E-Learning E-Paper The Standard Group Corporate RSS
Login x Sections Football Rugby Boxing Golf Tennis Basketball Athletics Olympics Volleyball and Handball Cricket Hockey Gossip & Rumours World Cup 2018 Sports Premier League Eliud Kipchoge videos E-Paper @Ksh.20

Man who inspired millions to do Ice Bucket Challenge dies

Last updated 7 months ago | By Reuters

Ice Bucket Challenge inspiration Pete Frates dead at 34

Pete Frates, whose battle with ALS inspired the Ice Bucket Challenge that raised millions for research, died on Monday at age 34 after a seven-year battle with the disease, Boston College said.

The former BC baseball captain, died at his home in Beverly, Massachusetts. He had been diagnosed with the neurodegenerative disease, which is also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, in 2012 at age 27.

SEE ALSO: Arsenal scout who discovered Fabregas set to leave amid redundancies

The Ice Bucket Challenge took place during the summer of 2014, when people around the world posted videos and photos of themselves dumping buckets of ice water on their heads and challenging others to do the same while urging donations for ALS research.

SEE ALSO: Dortmund insider says he's 'sure' Sancho will complete transfer to Man United

It raised more than $220 million, the ALS Association reported. In 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced it approved a drug that slows the effects of ALS.

Frates helped draw attention to the challenge through celebrity support from New England Patriots star Tom Brady, soon-to-become Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, former U.S. President George W. Bush, Bill Gates, Lady Gaga and others.

SEE ALSO: Willian to join Arsenal on Sh14 million-a-week contract for three years

Ex-Boston College baseball player Pete Frates

It was part of his long-time ALS advocacy, which he said inspired him to not just survive but thrive after being diagnosed with the deadly disease.

"(It) give me another reason to get out of bed every day," Frates told the Boston College newspaper, The Heights, roughly a year after his diagnosis.

"Being part of something bigger than yourself is one of the best things you can do," Frates said.

Feedback