Blow to NOCK as International Olympic Committee freezes funding to Kenya over failure to pass constitution

By Gilbert Wandera: Thursday, March 9th 2017 at 19:40 GMT +3 | Olympics
NOCK MEETING From Left- Relations Department Manager IOC Jerome Poivey, Irene Tindi of Centre for Multyparty Democracy, Paul Tergat and Mohamed Attoug chief of staff of the President of ANOCA during NOCK meeting at Hotel Panari in Tuesday, March 7, 2017. [PHOTO: JONAH ONYANGO/STANDARD]

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has frozen funding to its local affiliate after this week’s failure to pass a new constitution.

National Olympic Committee of Kenya (NOCK) Deputy Secretary General James Chacha said he was aware of the development though no official communication had come from the IOC.

Chacha however termed the move hasty and likely to affect the operations of the body.

“I have been made aware of the fact that funding has been frozen but we are yet to receive anything official from IOC. Even then, I think it is hasty and will affect our operations,” he said.

The funding from IOC goes to pay for office operations which means Nock may find it difficult to rent out their current offices. Employees’ salaries will also be affected by the move.

Another area that will be affected is the various scholarship programs offered by IOC to local sportsmen and women.

Chacha defended members of the Nock executive against accusations that they conspired to shoot down the new constitution.

“It was the general assembly that rejected the document. But that is not the end of it. We are willing to ensure a new constitution is passed and need time to do it,” he said.

During Tuesday’s meeting, executive members of the National Olympic Committee of Kenya (NOCK) ganged up to ensure a new constitution was not adopted.

The situation left Kenya facing a ban from the International Olympic Committee (IOC). The country will be on the agenda when the international body meets on March 16 and 17.

Failure to pass the new constitution happened despite a warning from IOC that dire consequences would follow should this not happen.

IOC had issued a directive requiring the proposed constitution to be passed as it had been negotiated for two months.

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