Smallville has been a popular series for sometime now

Vioja Mahakamani

The courtroom comedy that aired from the heydays of VOK, currently KBC, owes its signature instrumentals to brothers and duo, the Bata Shoeshine boys. Born in Mombasa Paddy Gwada and Rocky — better known as the Bata Shoeshine Boys — were sponsored by Bata Shoe Company and they became television stars in Kenya through their performances on the Bata Shoe Box game show in the early 1960s. Their most popular recording is Africa Sunset, recorded in 1965, perhaps better known as the instrumental signature tune to the television courtroom comedy, Vioja Mahakamani.

They later came to be known as the Ashanti after their Bata contract ended.

THE BIG BANG THEORY

The loved show that features nerds with awkward social relationships became a comedy favourite with its catchy tune. The theme song by Canadian rockers the Barenaked Ladies titled The History of Everything is up to date one of the most educational song mirroring the characters of the series.

PINK PANTHER

Besides being a pink panther that never uttered a word but made a good job at entertaining, has one of the catchiest instrumentals. Composed by Henry Mancini for the 1963 Pink Panther edition, different variations were done thereafter becoming a billboard hit and winning several awards including three Grammies. Originally played in the key E Minor, it is noted for its unusual quirky chromatics borrowed from the gypsy scale.

LOIS AND CLARK: THE NEW ADVENTURES OF SUPERMAN

The television series became a hit starring Dean Cain as Superman and Clark Kent and Terry Hatcher as Lois Lane skipping through heroism and romantic advances between the two main stars. The theme song composed by Jay Gruska was recorded with a 55-piece orchestra and has bagged several award nominations.

SMALLVILLE

Adding onto more TV addiction was the Superman-drama based on the comic Superman following the life of Clark Kent-Superman in a fictional town of Smallville. The memorable song, Save Me, is a song by American alternative rock band Remy Zero taken from their album, The Golden Hum that was released in 2001.

 

MISSION IMPOSSIBLE

Acknowledged as one of the greatest theme songs, the 1960’s version titled Theme from Mission: Impossible went on to appear on other Mission: Impossible franchise including TV series, films and video games. Written and composed by Lalo Schifrin in 1967, it was written on a 5/4 time signature, making it big in billboards across Europe and America.

NEIGHBOURS

Voted as one of the most recognised television theme songs ever, the song that has several versions recorded by Barry Crocker was composed by Tony Hatch with his then wife Jackie Trent behind the lyrics. The Australian soap opera that run through the 90s had many glued to the unfolding lives of the good neighbours we all seek.

THE POWERPUFF GIRLS

“...Sugar, spice and everything nice…” are the irresistible lyrics one would often find themselves singing to as the Townsville heroes appeared on screen. Composed by Chase, Rucker and Venable in 2000, the first song in the pop rock album titled Heroes and Villains, was released in 2000. Upon the album’s success two more were produced in electronica, punk-pop with some indie rock, garage rock and RnB.

JAMES BOND

With 50 years under its franchise, the spy drama has over ten theme songs with artistes such as Madonna, Alicia Keys, Sheryl Crow to name a few with their special renditions. The signature 007-theme music by the John Barry Orchestra written by John Barry in 1963 is by far the most identifying melody featured throughout the series that many know. Coming second is Goldfinger composed by John Barry and performed by Shirley Bassey who has performed the most Bond themes including Diamonds Are Forever. The minute you hear the saxophone and Bassey’s vibrato voice, you immediately think James Bond.

VITIMBI

The comical drama many have grown up watching got its original theme song from British Afro-pop band called Osibisa made up of four expatriate Ghanaians and three Caribbean musicians in the late 1960’s. The show borrowed the song titled Y-sharp from their second album called Woyaya that was released in 1971.