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Nairobi to bill aspirants for billboards if advertising firms default

By Josphat Thiong’o | Updated Fri, April 21st 2017 at 00:00 GMT +3
A billboard in the city. The county will start charging politicians for unpaid billboards. [Jacob Otieno, Standard]

The Nairobi County government will start charging politicians who put up billboards directly if their outdoor advertising firms default payment to City Hall.

Nairobi is currently flooded with the billboards and posters of many aspirants, right from governor to MCA positions.

Chief sub-county administrator, John Ntoiti Thursday warned politicians that if they put up advertisements with firms that owe the county money, they would be charged directly.

“If you wish to put up billboards and posters especially during this campaign season then you should ensure that your advertising company has remitted its monthly fee because we will bill you directly,” said Ntoiti.

He said a majority of the advertisement companies owe the county government money and the move was meant to recover the debt.

As of September last year, the county was owed Sh71.5 million by the outdoor advertising companies.

Ntoiti also took issue with the fact that the lion’s share of posters in the city had not been authorised by the city administration. He said in order for a poster to be put up, they needed to be stamped and approved which was not the case.

Approval charges

This, he said, was common especially in the sub-counties where posters were plastered on walls, shops, electricity transformers and even public utilities.

Speaking to The Standard, Ntoiti said the county charges Sh30,000 for the approval and stamping of posters.

Aspirants for various seats are required to have all their posters stamped as those found without official City Hall stamp will attract a fine of Sh100,000 or face six months in jail.

“Some of the aspirants come and pay for the stamping of 500 posters, but end up putting up more than double the number. This has led to the county losing revenue,” he said.