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Rift Valley
Environmentalists are calling for the culling of hippos around Lake Naivasha following increased human-wildlife conflict.

Environmentalists are calling for the culling of hippos around Lake Naivasha following increased human-wildlife conflict.

This came after a man was attacked and killed by a hippo in South Lake area bringing to nine the number of people killed the animals in the area this year.

The foot-fisherman was in the company of his colleagues when the lone hippo attacked him.

Incidentally, this is the same spot that another illegal fisherman was attacked and killed by a hippo late last week while on a fishing mission.

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David Kilo of the Lake Naivasha Boat Owners Association, called for increased patrols by the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) around the lake due to an increase in the number of illegal fishermen.

Mr Kilo noted that in nearly all the deaths, those involved were foot-fishermen who were fishing around the shores of the lake where the hippos breed.

“There is need to either cull the hippos or involve KWS in patrols around the lake as this will keep away the rising number of illegal fishermen,” he said. His sentiments were echoed by Friends of Lake Naivasha Chairman Francis Muthui who called on KWS to cull the animals.

Muthui said several parts of the lake had been invaded by the animals adding that it was becoming difficult even for tourists to explore the water body.

“We have seen relocation of buffaloes and zebras and the same should be done to hippos in this lake since they are increasing by the day and pose a danger (to humans),” he said.

SEE ALSO: Gangs rob marooned properties near Lake Naivasha


Lake Naivasha human-wildlife conflict

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