Dr. Edith Kamaru Kwobah. [Mercy Kahenda, Standard]

Death leaves a heartache no one can heal. The passing of Dr. Edith Kamaru Kwobah, a distinguished psychiatrist, is a loss that continues to resonate.

Dr. Kwobah, fondly known as the ‘girl from Ndeiya,’ was a beacon of hope. Her untimely departure has left a void that words struggle to fill.

Our paths crossed in 2019, through my former boss, Dr. Mercy Korir. What began as a professional acquaintance soon blossomed into a cherished friendship.

Dr. Kwobah was a reservoir of knowledge, always ready to share her insights despite her demanding schedule.

 I recall our first interview on sleep and insomnia for the ‘Ask the Doc’ segment in the Standard Newspaper’s Health and Science Magazine.

 She emphasised the importance of investing in sleep, stating, “Our bodies can only function when re-energised through proper sleeping patterns.”

 Her brilliance, humility, and empathy were evident in every interaction. She was a constant presence in my professional life, keeping me updated on developments in mental health and inviting me to various events.

 Dr. Kwobah was passionate about mental wellbeing and self-care. She often reminded me, “Mercy, it is okay not to be okay.” She was a champion for change in mental health, choosing psychiatry over more popular specialties like gynaecology and surgery.

 On International Women’s Day, despite battling cancer, Dr. Kwobah reached out, her spirit undiminished. She shared her treatment journey, her concerns for her firstborn daughter Elsie, and her plans to return to work once she regained her strength.

 Tragically, just two weeks after our conversation, Dr. Kwobah passed away.

 Before her cancer diagnosis, I had sought her expertise on a hysteria incident at St Theresa Eregi Girls. Despite her illness, she provided invaluable input, revealing her diagnosis only later.

 Dr. Kwobah’s courage in the face of adversity was inspiring. She used her personal journey to offer hope to other cancer patients, turning her Facebook page into a beacon of inspiration.

 Dr. Kwobah was more than a professional contact; she was a friend who checked in regularly and shared developments in health spaces and mental illnesses. She was passionate about mental wellbeing and self-care and encouraged individuals to have a strong support system for personal growth.

 Today, as we bid farewell to Dr. Kwobah, her legacy lives on. Her life serves as a testament to the power of resilience, the importance of self-care, and the indomitable spirit of humanity.

She is survived by her husband, Dr. Charles Kwobah, and three daughters.